Nothing Is Boring


Its easy to mistake the experience of boredom as a state in which the mind is not properly stimulated by a present situation; in ‘what's going on isn't interesting.’ But when we examine it closely, we find that boredom is actually felt stirrings of worry and anxiety that arise when the mind is not entranced by the world.

So what are we anxious of, worried about? None other than the unattended, unexplored emotions that inevitably arise after abandonments, break ups, rejections, traumatic fears, times of confusion and on that we've pushed out of awareness.

Its important to understand that, after disappointing events, the mind tends to run off in search of distractions, rather than discern the full articulation of feelings and moods in the body and mind. These impressions don't go away, they lie in the shadows, announcing their presence when the mind isn't distracted by the world.

So boredom can be viewed as an invitation to turn inwards and become aware of what we spent our lives avoiding, the full experience of life itself, not just the inner states that feel good. It's only when we truly attend to our feelings, moods and emotions that we experience depth and real humanity.